Touffailles, France – and Why You Need to Go There

I arrived in Touffailles from Valencia, Spain. There is a bus line, train, and airport as modes of transportation to Toulouse, which is a city near Touffailles. From Spain you can easily get there from Valencia or Barcelona. Touffailles gave me a glimpse of the quaint, historical, flourishing land of French countryside. Before, my only experience had been the bustling tourist destination of Paris. Touffailles is an entirely different world. If you enjoy rustic buildings, old architecture, slow village life, and gorgeous natural scenery (with plenty of open land) Touffailles is the spot for you. Upon arrival I ate at a café—enjoying cheap but strong coffee and yet another delectable unpronounceable chocolate pastry—in a square closed in by an 11th century abbey. After breakfast, I ventured inside the church; its foundations were built in 600 A.D. and painted walls and arched ceilings were added in the 1000’s. The inside of the church sparkled with high stained glass windows and the walls shone uniquely of hand-painted gold and red that stretched all the way to the arched ceilings. After leaving the square I resided in my B&B for the next three days (relatives!), which is settled in a small village that is surrounded by blooming green hills and colorful flowers. The old houses in this area were the real treat. Rustic and beautiful, my room over looked the village, equipped with chapels, old churches, and homes sprinkled between the hills. So far, I’m loving Touffailles.

My first night in southern France I spent at a weekly evening Marché Gourmand in a square in Lauzerte. There, I enjoyed curried sausage, a local beer mixed with lemonade, and my first ever snail! Drenched in garlic—they’re not half bad. There was live music, dancing, and local vendors selling a variety of dishes. French chips (French fries) are delicious and so are their crepes; I had a Nutella one for dessert. Around the square you can take in the views of Lauzerte below you. Many towns are atop hills like this because in the ancient world they were built up high for protection. A particularly good locally grown wine was the Château d’ Aix Rosé. This square hosts these evenings every Thursday during the months of July and August.

On the second day I enjoyed yet another beautiful view of the French southern countryside atop a hill in Tournon-d’Agenais. In this area you will find many war memorials, churches, and breath-taking scenery.

Sitting outside looking down the rolling hills on which this small village is perched, surrounded by vibrant flowers and their accompanying butterflies and bees, one cannot help but be inspired. Touffailles is an undiscovered gem of the world.

 

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